This blog is all about tech head and lot more.

Follow us

LightBlog

Breaking

Wednesday, February 8, 2017

How To Photograph An Object Like a Pro


Do you want to take dramatic photos of the awesome exotic things you'll find at shows? Or perhaps you want to get great shots of your own gorgeous car house or even yourself?


Taking a smart photography isn't always easy, but if you follow a few simple rules then you'll quickly start to improve your shots. It doesn't take much equipment to get started either -- just your camera, and a passion for great photos.



*Get your material together

The only two pieces of gear you really need are your camera and what so ever you want to camera. Even your iPhone can capture impressive shots, but if you want professional-looking results, shoot on a dSLR. A reasonably wide lens (around 24mm) will help you capture the car resplendent in its environment. A macro lens -- I use Canon's 100mm f/2.8 -- will be necessary when you want to get close up on details such as wheels, badges or interior components.


When setting up your camera, ensure you're taking shots in raw format. This will give you more scope to tone down highlights or lift shadows, both of which may be critical. I'll come back to editing later.



A tripod is a good idea as it'll help secure your camera, allowing you to take longer exposures, which lets in more light when you're shooting in darker conditions. 

If you're shooting your own stuffs out and about then make sure it's as clean as possible before you leave home. It'll still pick up the odd splash of mud when driving to your location, however, so make sure to have a roll of cleaning paper and some sort of liquid spray to wipe off any marks.

*Consider your location

If you have the option to shoot in different places, think carefully about what sort of location suits the style of pix you want.  

so try a pretty little town instead. It's not difficult to find an appropriate place for your photo suit.  Just avoid taking photos in a car park -- those painted white lines on the ground don't add much to a dramatic photo!

*Get your angles right

If you're shooting your own on location, you'll be able to move it around to find the best angle. Many photographers place their camera at a low level, almost looking up at the object, to give it an imposing, dramatic look. 

Sure, it's possible to Photoshop yourself out of the shot, but it's easier if you're just not in it in the first place. You should position the self or object so the best part of your chosen background is behind it, and if you can use any object to hide any distraction






*Don't forget the details

It's tempting to spend all your time trying to photograph the entire object from a variety of different angles, but don't forget to move in close to show off some of the key details. First, get inside and snap your shots of the interior that makes the object stand out.


No comments:

Adbox